family letter

March 23, 2020, 

HEALTH PRECAUTIONS https://www.cdc.gov/

This is a good opportunity to remember that flu season is still with us. The same everyday precautions that help prevent the spread of COVID-19 can also help prevent the flu. Please continue to follow school protocols, in that any student exhibiting a fever or flu-like symptoms should stay home and have appropriate medical treatment.   

Students are reminded to practice good respiratory etiquette:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 

  • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

COUGHING & SNEEZING

Hygiene etiquette involves practices that prevent the spread of illness and disease. A critical time to practice good hygiene etiquette is when you are sick, especially when coughing or sneezing. Serious respiratory illnesses like influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are spread by:

  • Coughing or sneezing

  • Unclean hands

    • Touching your face after touching contaminated objects

    • Touching objects after contaminating your hands

To help stop the spread of germs:

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.

  • Put your used tissue in a waste basket.

  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.

Remember to wash your hands after coughing or sneezing:

  • Wash with soap and water, or

  • Keeping hands clean through improved hand hygiene is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others. Many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water. If clean, running water is not accessible, as is common in many parts of the world, use soap and available water. If soap and water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to clean hands.

One final practice that helps prevent the spread of respiratory disease is avoiding close contact with people who are sick. If you are ill, you should try to distance yourself from others so you do not spread your germs. Distancing includes staying home from work or school when possible.

family letter

Malaki 09, 2020

“Being kind does not have to cost a thing. Words are free, smiles are free, actions are free.”

Dear ‘Ohana,

Our thoughts this week are about kindness. We invite our ‘Ohana, students and staff to take conscious efforts every day to show kindness at home, in school and with each other. When we do this we help to create a safer and more nurturing environment where people can thrive, do their best work and feel that they belong. It doesn't take much to be kind - a compliment, a smile or helping someone without expecting anything in return. We can never know how people are feeling or what they’ve been through so it’s always best to not judge, gossip or tease anyone. 

Each of us can be an example of kindness. If someone starts to say unkind things gently remind them to use kind words. Walk away from situations that will not end up positive. Do not encourage or provoke unkind behavior. Do not share or post negative comments about others on social media.  If you see someone who needs help, report it to a trusted adult right away. Together we can make a positive impact in our world and community. 

The Importance of Kindness (shared by: G. Lind) 

Kindness is a key contributor to happiness. It’s important to realize the positivity that kindness can produce in our lives. Acting with kindness is a win-win. Not only can it provide someone with a sense of pride by acting kindly towards others, but it also has the potential to boost the confidence and provoke bliss in those around us. 

It’s acceptable to have a bad day every now and then. I mean, who doesn’t? Yes, we are all guilty of exerting our anger towards our loved ones, and sometimes strangers when we’re overwhelmed, angry, or frustrated. It happens, but we should strive to be more conscious of others’ feelings and think before we act. We need to realize that being mean gets us nowhere. If anything, it takes us back a few steps and proves a weakness.

Kindness is a quality that is contagious. When people notice others being kind, they become inspired themselves to act that way.

Mahalo piha,
U’ilani Kaitoku

family letter

Pepeluali 24, 2020

 

Last week was our Drug Free week.  And it was a fun-filled week for everyone.  We started our week with guest speakers from the Honolulu Police Department on Tuesday.  They sent their D.A.R.E. program officers and Narcotics K-9 Unit to speak to our students about the dangers of vaping and bullying.  On Wednesday, we had members of our Fitness Team challenging our faculty and staff in a friendly CrossFit competition. Our teachers and staff gave a valiant effort to keep up and give our Fitness Team the competition.  The Fitness Team also took time to run CrossFit stations for all students. On Thursday, we had our students taking the pledge to be tobacco, alcohol and drug free. We also had the senior peer mentoring class from Kahuku High and Intermediate School (KHIS) speak to our students about Choosing Love in all situations.  This is a Social Emotional Learning program being implemented at KHIS. Then we finished out the week with sports station activities and one of our very own, Braelyn Akana, who is currently playing for the Wahine Volleyball team as an outside hitter and middle blocker. Braelyn came and spoke to our students about her experience as a student at Hau’ula Elementary and UH Manoa.

 

We are very thankful to all our teachers for their support and flexibility to allow a fun-filled week to take place.  We also would like to send a big mahalos to all our speakers who took time out of their busy schedule to speak to our students.  And a huge thanks goes out to our counselors, Mr. Nikora and Mrs. Teichert, for planning and organizing Drug Free week.

 

Me ke aloha pumehana,

Mr. Carrasco, Hope Po’okumu

 

Pepeluali 18, 2020

 

‘Ōlelo No‘eau: E Aloha Kekahi I Kekahi “Love One Another”

 

“The cultural responsibility (kuleana) to the land of Hawaii is manifested through the care and love of one’s surroundings. This value is reflected through education and actions which focus on maintaining a harmonious relationship with the land and people of Hawai’i. Reverence of aina is referenced in songs, dances and chants, signifying its importance amongst the people. The aina gives back with its nurturing resources, food, sunsets, and lush landscapes.

 

When you begin to reflect on these deeper questions, you become aware.  Awareness is the first step in the guide to gracefully translate aloha kekahi i kekahi principles into action. When in the act of aloha kekahi i kekahi, there’s a profound resonance of bliss and unfolding divinity. By mindfully applying its essence, the benefits you receive include greater acceptance and increased patience. You will feel a grounded compassion while facing challenging situations and relationships.”

 

http://www.manoanow.org/kaleo/nso/aloha-kekahi-i-kekahi/article_30140cde-0c9d-11e4-a5ab-0017a43b2370.html

Pepeluali 03, 2020
E OLA MAU I KA ʻŌLELO HAWAIʻI ~ Long live the Hawaiian Language!


Join us in celebrating Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, Hawaiian Language Month - recognizing Hawaiian as an official language of our State.

 

We invite our friends and ‘Ohana to incorporate the Hawaiian Language in daily conversations and writing. See the resources below to get you started. History of Hawaiian Education: Established in 1840 by King Kamehameha III, the public education system in Hawaiʻi is the oldest educational system west of the Mississippi and the only system established by a sovereign monarch. This could also be considered the first system of Hawaiian education, as the curriculum was delivered through the medium of the Hawaiian language — the Hawaiian language was the main language used in instructing students.

 

Shortly after this period, the increase of foreign influence in politics and economics (labor) changed Hawaiian education as English eventually became the medium of instruction. After the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893, teaching and learning through the medium of Hawaiian was banned in 1896. Many Hawaiian elders have told of being punished for speaking Hawaiian at school. The Hawaiian language would not be heard in schools for the next four generations.


In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a resurgence in cultural pride and identity led to a significant increase in the interest in and the practice of the Hawaiian culture. A major movement of grassroots support for music, hula and language activities in the community emerged. This renaissance in Hawaiian culture led to community demand for more Hawaiian-oriented courses of study in schools and colleges. The concern that the Hawaiian language would be lost with the passing of the existing native speakers became a major focus, in view of the belief that understanding of the Hawaiian language is the key to fully understanding the whole culture of the Hawaiian people. Efforts began to revitalize the language.

 

The State Constitution was amended in 1978 to include Article X, Section 4 which mandated that the State promote "the study of Hawaiian culture, history, and language" by providing a Hawaiian education program and using community expertise "as a suitable and essential means in furtherance of Hawaiian education." Furthermore Article XV, Section 4 officially recognizes Hawaiian as an official language of the State. These political changes led to changes in the educational system. HIDOE History of Hawaiian Education

 

ʻŌLELO HAWAIʻI RESOURCES:

Hawaiian Language Apps: ps.com/languages/learn-hawaiian
Duolingo: https://www.duolingo.com/course/hw/en/Learn-Hawaiian
Wehewehe Wikiwiki Translation site: https://hilo.hawaii.edu/wehe/
Simple phrases to use with nā keiki: Maikai‘i loa! (Very good!) ‘Eleu nō!
(You’re on it!) Akamai nō ho‘i! (Very smart!) Mahalo a nui loa. (Thank you
very much.) ‘Ae, pololei. (You are correct.) ‘A ‘o ia! (That’s it!)
E nä keiki (Oh children) E ho‘olohe mai. (Listen) E hämau. (Be quiet.) E kū
laina. (Get in line.) E noho i lalo. (Sit down.) E kū i luna. (Stand up.) E nānā.
(Pay attention.) E ho‘omākaukau. (Get ready.) E kau i kou lima i luna.
(Raise your hands.) E kōkua mai. (Help me.) ‘eleu! (Hurry! Be alert!)
ʻŌlelo No‘eau Wise Sayings: ʻŌlelo No‘eau Wise Sayings Link
Hawaiian Reading: Harry Potter a me ka Pōhaku Akeakamai
Basic conversational phrases:
Nīnau: ʻO wai kou inoa? (What is your name?)
Pane: ʻO [inoa] koʻu inoa. (My name is [name].)
Nīnau: No hea mai ‘oe? (Where are you from?)
Pane: No [birthplace] mai au (I am from [birthplace])
Nīnau: Pehea ‘oe (i kēia lā)? (How are you (today)?)
Pane: Maika’i au (I’m fine), Luhi au (I’m tired), Hau'oli au (I’m happy),
Kaumaha au (I’m sad), Pīhoihoi au (I’m excited), Huhū (I’m angry), Piula au (Iʻm exhausted).

January 13, 2020

 

 

 

 

 


Aloha Parents,


As Needed Parent Conferences: will take place on January 23-24. School will end at 1:05pm on both days. These conferences will be
held on an “as needed” basis and will vary for each student. While the main focus continues to be about learning and your child’s
progress, topics that are also discussed are the factors that can affect learning, such as students' behavioral and social
development: peer relationships, classroom behavior, motivation and work habits, as well as students' strengths and challenges.


Teachers will be communicating directly with parents if a conference is needed. Parents who are not contacted, but wish to
set up a parent conference with their child’s teacher may do so by letting the teacher know.

 

School Quality Survey (SQS) Every year, the Hawaii Department of Education sends out a parent survey to gather feedback about
your child’s school. A survey was recently sent home to every child. We humbly ask for a few moments of your time to complete it. The
survey provides information on how schools are doing with respect to school culture, satisfaction, safety and engagement.

 

The feedback gathered is used to support school planning and improvement efforts. Your feedback about Hau‘ula School is
important to us. Each household is asked to complete one survey per child and mail it using the postage paid envelope by March 11,
2020.


Mahalo Piha,
U‘ilani K. Kaitoku, Po‘okumu

Hau‘oli Makahiki Hou kākou,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome back to the continuation of a wonderful school year. I hope you and your ‘Ohana enjoyed your time together and that 2020 brings good health and many opportunities for continued learning and success. As we start the second semester, our focus will be greater growth and progress in reaching our Academic goals.  We are also striving to sustain and model positive and healthy relationships across the home and all school settings through acts of kindness and aloha. Our teachers continue to work collaboratively to develop engaging and relevant lessons appropriate for each child’s needs and monitor their progress. Counselors are expanding their interventions to help students be in control of their emotions and feelings. We are using professional waiver days to gather and expand our learning and add to our educator’s toolkit. 

 

Second quarter report cards will be distributed on January 16, 2020. Please take some time to review your child’s progress and any areas that may need additional attention. If you have any questions regarding your child’s progress, please be sure to contact your child's teacher. It is important to communicate regularly to insure your child’s success in school. When families are involved in their child’s education in positive ways, children achieve higher grades and test scores, have better attendance, complete homework and demonstrate more positive attitudes and behaviors. Set time aside every day to talk with your child about school, highlight their strengths, celebrate progress, help them to problem solve, read with them and share your joy of learning with them. As your child’s first teacher, you have the greatest influence in your child’s life.

 

Finally, as we prepare to return from Winter Break here are a few tips that can help students get back into school routines: (excerpts from parenttoolkit.com co-written by Michelle Icard and Tim Tinnesz)

 

1. Restart the School Routine Early

One of the simplest ways to get back into the groove with school is to restart the routine early - a few days before your child actually has to return to school. Put clothes out the night before, set visual reminders or a to do list for the morning. Practice going to sleep early and waking up early. 

 

2. Eliminate any Challenges

You know your child better than anyone. If they are a heavy sleeper make sure the alarm is set with enough time to get ready. If they have a hard time staying organized make sure their backpack is in tact, footwear is accessible, school supplies are replenished and extra change of clothes are the right size.

 

3. Fresh Start

Time off from regular routines can make it challenging for anyone to return to their regular routine. That’s why it’s important to have an understanding of how your child might be feeling about returning to school. Be excited, don’t speak negatively to them or about school. Let them know how proud you are of them and that you support them.

 

Mahalo Piha,

U‘ilani K. Kaitoku, Po‘okumu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Parents and 'Ohana,
Math Certification
To strengthen our Math proficiency skills we are implementing a Math Certification Program for all students grades K-6 to help
master basic math facts. Acquiring these facts will prepare students for math success in meeting grade-level standards.


How Does the Math Certification Program Work?
The Math Certification Program consists of seven levels. Students take a timed test to pass each level. By the end of 2nd grade,
students should know their addition and subtraction facts within 20. By the end of 3rd grade, students should know their
multiplication and division facts within 10. By the end of 6th grade, students who pass all levels and the exit test will receive a
Certification Award signed by the Complex Area Superintendent.


How Can I Help My Child?
Students who are struggling in Math or are wanting to excel, need regular practice. Here are some resources available that can be
done at home:
https://www.mathfactcafe.com/
https://xtramath.org/#/home/index,
https://login.i-ready.com/(Student login)
https://www.ixl.com/standards/hawaii/math (Student login)
In addition to the online resources, we offer free afterschool classes that can also boost your child’s success in Math. Please sign
up at the front office today if you haven’t done so already.
● iReady
● Homework Boosters
Program Levels
Beginning:
Count to 100 by 1s and 10s; Addition and Subtraction within 5
Level 1:Addition and Subtraction within 10

www.hauulaelementary.com
FB @hauulaelementary
Twitter @hauula_el
Instagram @hauula_el

FULLY ACCREDITED BY WASC WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 2019

Level 2: Addition and Subtraction within 20
Level 3: Multiplication and Division facts up to 10
Level 4:
Fraction – Decimal Conversions with denominators of 10 and 100
Level 5:
Fraction – Decimal Conversions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10,
100
Addition and Subtraction with like denominators
Level 6:
Fraction/Decimal/Percent Conversions with denominators of 2, 3,
4, 5, 10, 100
Addition and Subtraction with unlike denominators
Mahalo for your continued support. Please let us know if you have
questions. (305-2100)
Mahalo piha,
Uilani Kaitoku, Po‘okumu Carlo Carrasco, Hope Po ‘okumu
Principal Vice-Principal

Dear Parents and 'Ohana,
Math Certification
To strengthen our Math proficiency skills we are implementing a Math Certification Program for all students grades K-6 to help
master basic math facts. Acquiring these facts will prepare students for math success in meeting grade-level standards.


How Does the Math Certification Program Work?
The Math Certification Program consists of seven levels. Students take a timed test to pass each level. By the end of 2nd grade,
students should know their addition and subtraction facts within 20. By the end of 3rd grade, students should know their
multiplication and division facts within 10. By the end of 6th grade, students who pass all levels and the exit test will receive a
Certification Award signed by the Complex Area Superintendent.


How Can I Help My Child?
Students who are struggling in Math or are wanting to excel, need regular practice. Here are some resources available that can be
done at home:
https://www.mathfactcafe.com/
https://xtramath.org/#/home/index,
https://login.i-ready.com/(Student login)
https://www.ixl.com/standards/hawaii/math (Student login)
In addition to the online resources, we offer free afterschool classes that can also boost your child’s success in Math. Please sign
up at the front office today if you haven’t done so already.
● iReady
● Homework Boosters
Program Levels
Beginning:
Count to 100 by 1s and 10s; Addition and Subtraction within 5
Level 1:Addition and Subtraction within 10

www.hauulaelementary.com
FB @hauulaelementary
Twitter @hauula_el
Instagram @hauula_el

FULLY ACCREDITED BY WASC WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 2019

Level 2: Addition and Subtraction within 20
Level 3: Multiplication and Division facts up to 10
Level 4:
Fraction – Decimal Conversions with denominators of 10 and 100
Level 5:
Fraction – Decimal Conversions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10,
100
Addition and Subtraction with like denominators
Level 6:
Fraction/Decimal/Percent Conversions with denominators of 2, 3,
4, 5, 10, 100
Addition and Subtraction with unlike denominators
Mahalo for your continued support. Please let us know if you have
questions. (305-2100)


Mahalo piha,
Uilani Kaitoku, Po‘okumu Carlo Carrasco, Hope Po ‘okumu
Principal Vice-Principal

October 28, 2019

 

Dear Parents/Guardians,

 

As you attend Parent Teacher Conferences, please take time to review our Parent Involvement Policy which is also aligned to the Board of Education’s Parent/Family Involvement Policy:

 

A child's education is a responsibility shared by the school and the family during the entire period the child spends in school. To support the goal of the Department of Education, which is to educate all students effectively, schools and parents must work as knowledgeable partners.

 

Although parents are diverse in culture, language, and needs, they share the schools’ commitment to the educational success of their children. The Department and its schools, in collaboration with parents, shall establish programs and practices that enhance parent involvement and reflect the specific needs of students and their families.

 

To this end, the Board of Education supports the Department in the development, implementation, and regular evaluation of parent involvement programs in each school. The implementation will involve parents at all grade levels in a variety of roles, including input in decision-making processes and practices. The parent involvement program will be comprehensive and coordinated in nature. It will include, but not be limited to, the following components of successful parent involvement programs:

 

● Communication between home and school is regular, two-way, and meaningful.

● Responsible parenting is promoted and supported.

● Parents play an integral role in assisting student learning, including the successful achievement of the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards.

● Parents are welcome in the school, and their support and assistance are sought.

● Parents are partners in the decisions that affect children and families.

● Community resources are made available to strengthen school programs, family practices, and student learning.

 

The Department shall implement administrative guidelines that support professional development opportunities for staff members to enhance understanding of effective parent involvement strategies. The Department recognizes the importance of administrative leadership in setting expectations and creating a climate conducive to parental participation. Engaging parents is essential to improved student achievement and to realize the Vision of a Public School Graduate.

 

Attending Parent Teacher Conferences is one of the ways to get involved so we’re glad you are making time to speak with your child and your child’s teacher. 

 

Our School Parent Student Compact is a way to communicate our shared responsibilities and commitment for improving student achievement and success, and how the school and parents will build and develop partnerships to help children attain a high standard of quality education.  

 

Please review the following shared responsibilities and let us know if there is something you believe we should add.

 

As a School: 

The school understands the importance of the school experience to every student and their role as educators and models. Therefore, the school agrees to carry out the following responsibilities to the best of their ability: 

  • Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under this part to meet the challenging State academic standards

  • Address the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis through, at a minimum—

    • parent-teacher conferences at least once a school year

    • frequent reports to parents on their children’s progress

    • reasonable access to staff

    • opportunities to volunteer and participate in your child’s class, and observation of classroom activities

    • ensuring regular two-way, meaningful communication between family members and school staff and, to the extent practicable, in a language that family members can understand. (required) (ESSA, Section 1116(d)(1-2))

  • Treat each child with dignity and respect

  • Strive to address the individual needs of the student

  • Parents are vital to the success of child and school

  • Provide a safe, positive and healthy learning environment

  • Assure every student access to quality learning experiences

  • Assure that the school staff communicates clear expectations for performance to both students and parents

 

As a Parent:

The parent understands that participation in his/her student's education will help his/her achievement and attitude. Therefore, the parent will continue to carry out the following responsibilities to the best of his/her ability:

  • Volunteering in your child’s classroom 

  • Supporting your child’s learning

  • Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of your child and positive use of extracurricular time

  • Create a home atmosphere that supports learning

  • Send your child to school on time, well-fed, and well-rested on a regular basis

  • Attend school functions and conference

  • Encourage their child to show respect for all members of the school community and school property

  • Review all school communications and respond promptly

As a Student:

The student realizes education is important. He/she is the one responsible for his/her own success. Therefore, he/she agrees to carry out the following responsibilities to the best of his/her ability: 

  • Get to school on time every day

  • Develop a positive attitude toward school

  • Be responsible for completing homework on time

  • Be cooperative by carrying out the teacher’s instructions and ask for help when needed

  • Do daily work that is neat and reflects the student’s best effort

  • Be respectful to all school members and to school property

 

Please feel free to call us at 305-2100 to share your feedback.

 

Mahalo piha,


Uilani K. Kaitou, Po‘okumu               Carlo Carrasco, Hope Po‘okumu

October 21, 2019 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aloha Students and Families, 

 

For our message of the week we’re going over some strategies for children seeking attention.  All children deserve a certain amount of positive attention. Most receive it unconditionally while others have to resort to seeking out attention, usually in negative ways.  Some children seem to need only small amounts of attention while others cant seem to get enough. Many experts believe that attention seekers feel inadequate, have low self-esteem, and lack a sense of belonging.  Other attention seekers act out to divert attention away from their problems. Here are some strategies you can use at home to help:

Children need to be taught appropriate ways to get our attention.  In school students learn to raise their hands. At home children need to speak politely when requesting time and attention.  

Make sure children are eating and sleeping well.  Hungry and tired students don’t learn as much in school.  These children tend to whine and complain a lot.

Every day fine time to let each child know that they are loved and appreciated.  Parents can do this with hugs and “I love you.” Teachers can do it with handshakes, pats on the back, and a “Welcome to class.”

Children need recognition.  Let them know that you are aware of their responsible behaviors.

Discover their strengths, gifts and talents.  If John is a good artist, hang some of his pictures in the house.  If Alex wishes to be the class clown, allow him to tell a few jokes to the class on Friday afternoons.

October 14, 2019


Aloha Students and Families,
Welcome back from fall break! Time together is a very important part of a successful family. Families not only need time together,
but the time needs to be a fun, happy experience for all members. Even at today’s hectic pace, parents, with some creativity, can
build family fun. Families that play, laugh, and hug a lot, survive!

Let’s look at some ways we can create family fun and strengthen our relationships.

1. Create several family traditions and stick with them. Traditions can act as the glue in many families and children seldom forget them.


2. Eat several meals a week together. This gives all members time to talk. Parents should not always dominate the conversation. Also, you can get a bit silly and creative with menu items. How about green eggs and ham to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday?


3. Children love to play with parents. Invite your children outside to play catch, ride a bike, or kick a ball.


4. Parents must love every child unconditionally. Hugs and “I love you,” must happen daily.

Please call our Counseling Department if we can be of assistance to you. 305-2100. Mahalo!


Mr. Nikora, Mrs. Teichert, Aunty Loke, and Aunty Roseanne

September 30, 2019


Aloha Students and Families,


We are already at the end ofFirst Quarter - can you believe it?

 

Parent/Teacher Conferences are coming up in October and we wanted to give you information so you could plan ahead. Forms will be coming home to sign up for a meeting with your child’s teacher. It is important for you to participate in these conferences as this will help you and your child’s teacher to support your child’s learning. Conferences will be held on . School will end at 1:05 pm on these days.

 

To prepare for the conference, please see parent tips and resources that we hope you will find helpful.

 

What should I expect?

A two-way conversation. The conference is a time for you to learn about your child’s progress in school. You can share your child’s skills, interests, needs, and dreams with the teacher so they know more about your child.

Emphasis on learning. Good conferences focus on how well your child is doing in school and how your child can do even better.

 

How should I get ready?
Be prepared for the conversation - look at your child’s homework, tests, and notices before the conference. Bring questions that you would like to ask the teacher.

 

Opportunities and challenges. Just like you, teachers want your child to succeed. You will hear positive feedback about your child’s progress and areas for improvement. Be prepared by thinking about your child’s strengths and challenges beforehand. Be ready to ask questions about ways you and the teacher can help your child with some of his or her challenges.

What should you talk to the teacher about?

. Find out how your child is doing by asking questions: Is my child performing at grade level? How is my child doing compared to the rest of the class? What do you see as his or her strengths? How could he or she improve?

 

Ask for examples of your child’s work. Be familiar with how your child’s teacher grades. Support learning at home. Ask what you can do at home to help your child learn.

 

Support learning at school. Find out what supports are available at the school to help your child.

 

How should I follow up?
Make a plan. Write down the things that you and the teacher will each do to support your child.

How will you keep communication going? What is the best way for you and your child’s teacher to communicate? Keep in touch as you need to.


Talk to your child. The parent–teacher conference is all about your child, so don’t forget to include your child. Share with your child what you learned. Show your child how you will help with learning at home. Ask for his or her suggestions.
(Adapted from the Harvard Family Research Project, October 2010. www.hfrp.org)


HIDOE Standards Toolkit Standards Toolkit Link
Parent Roadmaps to Standards K-8
http://www.cgcs.org/domain/36 (English Language Arts)
http://www.cgcs.org/Page/244 (Math)
Ka Papahana Kaiapuni (KPK) Standards KPK Standards Link
Hawaiian Language Immersion Programs Hawaiian Language
Immersion Link
Attendance Matters http://www.attendanceworks.org/
Parenting Resources
http://www.hawaiistateptsa.org/for-parents.html
Great Kids Go to Great Kids Milestones site
Be a Learning Hero: http://bealearninghero.org/

September 23, 2019

 

Aloha Hau’ula Families and Students, 

 

 

We know that today’s technology is amazing!  Although technology benefits our children in many ways, children are always at risk while searching the internet.  They may be exposed to inappropriate material, be victims of harassment, and become targets of child predators.  On Thursday, September 19th Officer Unga from the Honolulu Police Department came to our school’s Parent Night and presented on cyberbullying. 

Here are a few tips and tricks to ensure our keiki are using technology safely.

 

1.  Set limits on how much time children sit in front of the computer or use a phone.  They need to get outdoors, read, get exercise, and spend time with family.

2.   Consider keeping the computer and other electronics in a central location rather than in the child’s room.  This will help you to monitor your child’s activities.

3.  Tell them to never respond to threatening or offensive messages and have them tell you immediately if they do get such messages.

4.  Remind your keiki to never give out any personal information and to never meet in person anyone they have met online without parental permission.

 

Please call our Counseling Department if we can be of assistance to you. 305-2100. 

 

 

Mr. Nikora, Mrs. Tiechert, Aunty Loke and Aunty Roseanne

family letter

family letter

family letter

family letter

family letter

family letter

© 2018 - Hau`ula Elementary  •  54-046 Kamehameha Hwy, Hau`ula, HI 96717  •  Tel: (808) 305-2100

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